Mexico City Altar by Kateri Aragón and Deidre Kateri Aragón (Sponsored by Live The Language), 2015, Mexic-Arte Museum. Photo by Sixto-Juan Zavala. 

Mexico City Altar by Kateri Aragón and Deidre Kateri Aragón (Sponsored by Live The Language), 2015, Mexic-Arte Museum. Photo by Sixto-Juan Zavala. 

COMMUNITY ALTARS: OFRENDAS INSPIRED FROM THE STATES OF MEXICO

September 12 – November 22, 2015

Community Altars: Ofrendas Inspired from the States of Mexico coincides with the Mexic-Arte Museum’s 32nd Annual Celebration of El Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). This year’s exhibition features artists, community groups, and individuals who created commemorative altars inspired by the various states of Mexico (highlighting Guanajuato, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacán, Oaxaca, Puebla, San Luis Potosí, Veracruz, Mexico D.F., and Coahuila). Each region has its own nuances and customs unique to the celebration; the altars on display highlight regional and cultural differences among the various Mexican states.

El Día de los Muertos is an ancient Mexican and Mexican American religious holiday with a historically rich tradition that integrates both pre-Columbian and Catholic customs. It is often celebrated on November 1 and 2 in connection with the Catholic Holy Days of All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day (dates and length of the celebration vary by state or region). In the celebrants’ minds, the holiday is a time to honor and greet their deceased relatives and friends, who make the journey back from Mictlan (the underworld in Aztec culture) to be with the living each year. These days are a time for families and friends to gather in celebration of life and death, embracing the circle of life rather than loss and sorrow.